Dave Clarke speaks the truth about plague raves. But why can the Baron of Techno not speak about Derrick May?

I have come to have a certain amount of respect for Dave Clarke over the past few months. When I initially blogged about him earlier in the year, I wasn’t very nice about him – particularly about his reluctant to speak out over mounting allegations of sexual abuse by Derrick May.

Has my view on him changed lately?

Somewhat, yes. I happen to agree 100%, for example, with his belief that the elder statesmen of dance music have a duty to speak out about issues in the scene. It’s something most of them shamefully neglect to do – here’s looking at you, Harry Romero! – and he seems to be more honest than most.

Here, for instance, he used his Facebook page to point out numerous things about plague raves and the supine, lazy dance music press that I wholeheartedly agree with.

But this is what I don’t understand. Mr Clarke is more than happy to talk about the scene, but when it comes to one of the stalwarts of the techno scene he loves being mired in sexual abuse allegations, he has little to say.

From what my sources tell me, Clarke is as keen as anyone else to see what the truth behind all the allegations is. He’s also said that if Derrick May is found guilty of any of the allegations, he should be banished and never allowed to work in music again.

Once again, I find myself in total agreement. But I have to question why he’s being so reticent on this subject. He himself admits that he believes in plain speaking about the industry, and no one is claiming that he must express himself in a particular manner.

On this issue, however, I simply must raise an issue. No less than 18 different women have now accused May of various degrees of sexual mispropriety, up to and including rape. Graphic accounts from several women have been published – so graphic that I understand that Resident Advisor’s lawyers ordered one particularly hideous detail to be removed before publication.

One allegation, that could be questioned. Two, maybe. But 18 different ones?

Speak up, Mr Clarke and soon. Many will listen closely to what you have to say.