What took them so long? Mixmag FINALLY write something about Eric Prydz’s hopelessly vague comments on the techno genre – over two weeks after he said it!

As I said a few weeks ago, I’m very proud of what’s being created on this blog. I’m also particularly impressed with the fact that a one-man operation is basically able to outdo the dance music press – it just shows you in what a dire, moribund state the rest of them are.

I managed it a few weeks ago by reporting on Scotland’s reopening of nightclubs an entire week before Resident Advisor, under the truly disappointing editorial stewardship of Whitney Wei. And I’ve managed it again by reporting on Eric Prydz’s comments on the genre of techno on September 9th – a full ten days before Mixmag.

I have absolutely no idea why it’s taken them so long to write something about this, given some of the dross they’ve published lately – an article about Nile Rodgers falling in love with a Scouse canal made it onto the website last week.

Still, it’s not all bad – I note at the end of the article it states it was written by “Mixmag’s Weekend Editor”. I was surprised to discover this position has existed since at least January 2020, given the fact new content almost never appears on Mixmag’s site during the weekend. A great irony considering dance music culture is most alive on Friday and Saturday nights…

And judging by their Eric Prydz article – which offers nothing new at all to the debate – it looks like I can continue sleeping easily at night. Especially on the weekends…

Eric Prydz’s fear of flying means less time in the air, but no slacking on the luxury – so is there a lesson here for gas-guzzlers like Richy Ahmed and Louie Vega?

Last week, whilst everyone rowed over comments by Eric Prydz that techno was one thing until 2005 and then became something else, some people took a peek at the rest of his social media feeds. And they contain an awful lot of pictures of Prydz himself lounging in business class on long-haul flights.

Now, this blog has no problem with anyone getting a bit of enjoyment out of their money. Regardless of any debates, Prydz has done well for himself, so the fact he likes travelling in style doesn’t particularly bother me. But here’s where things get curious.

Prydz has a well-known fear of flying. He hates it, pure and simple. This meant in the earlier years of his career, it was extremely rare to see him performing outside Europe. The way he manages this now is to organise tours in such a way he has to take as few as possible.

However, when he does fly, he does it in style – paying that extra bit to get into business class. This solution reduces the number of flights he has to take and probably still saves him money even when those little extras are taken into account. The polar bears can continue living, and Prydz saves time and money. Just as well he’s saving money, I suppose…

Prydz knows nothing about lots of things. Techno music being one, letting granny die of Covid-19 being another. Remember this Twitter exchange?

But on this subject, Prydz is onto something. Perhaps there’s a solution here for DJs like Richy Ahmed, Louie Vega and Derrick Carter. Fewer flights, more money in their pockets and no need whatsoever to give up any luxuries!

Thank me later. Perhaps Eric could create another track from a well-trodden sample and get lots of girls to shake their arses to it to celebrate…

Is there any DJ out there who CAN convey a message these days? Eric Prydz sends out a tweet about techno music which has everyone scratching their heads…

I first encountered this particular one a few days ago, but I held off publishing. Frankly, I couldn’t quite work out what I made of it all – but last night, I had one of those revelatory moments where things became nice and clear.

Which is more than it ever was in the head of Eric Prydz when he tweeted this…

What does this mean exactly? Is Prydz trying to say that techno moved forwards from 1990 and 2004, then stopped in 2005? Did things change direction then, or did things just stop evolving in his eyes? Well, no one knows – because Prydz has gone silent on the subject.

I’ve written in the past about how quite a lot of the big DJs on the scene are, to be honest, a bit thick. They don’t seem to understand that Twitter is a two-way exchange. If you’re going to make a statement which you suspect will cause some debate, be prepared to defend your position.

In a subsequent tweet before he decided to run off for his next flight – goodness me, he likes business class, doesn’t he? – he tried to elaborate, claiming that since 2005, techno has been the music of the past. What he doesn’t explain is how he’s come to this position and the changes he’s seen personally over the years.

Which means that his view is essentially reduced to being a rant. For all we know, he might well have a case that techno isn’t as good as it used to be – but Prydz has decided to walk away from the fire he started. And when you start to look at Prydz’s personal record, it all starts to make sense.

Let’s remember that Prydz didn’t start out making techno. In his first few years in music, he mostly made his name out of remixes. There were some good ones in there – this one was a particular favourite of mine from that era – but you’d be hard pushed to describe any of it as techno. At best, most Eric Prydz productions take elements of techno and combine them with others.

Let’s also remember that Prydz is somewhat embarrassed about his own roots too. Which tune made him famous? “Call On Me”, released by Ministry of Sound in 2004. The idea came from a DJ Falcon and Thomas Bangalter bootleg from two years earlier which never got an official release. Prydz has refused to play the song which turned him into a superstar for many years now.

Oh, and one final word, Eric. Make sure you spell your words correctly. Because, er, there’s no easy way to put this, but…

What you’ve inadvertently suggested here is rather rude…