“Our contribution to the national and international reputation of the cultural sector could not be replaced” – Resident Advisor in their own less than humble words when seeking a bailout last year…

On Wednesday, someone was kind enough to send me a link to a file which contained the application form of Boiler Room for their bailout last year. I blogged about it then, much to everyone’s amusement.

What I forgot to mention was the papers for Resident Advisor were also included. And it would terrible shame for RA, as they call themselves, not to be part of the fun – so let’s have a look at some choice highlights. We’ll start with a snippet from the “Cultural Significance” section of the form, shall we?

They refer to the Save Our Scene movement, which was more to do with saving their own arses in the form of commission from ticket sales. They insultingly refer to Nottingham – which has its own cultural festival every year – as a city with “low levels of access to culture”.

And they have the sheer chutzpah to claim their “contribution to the national and international reputation of the cultural sector could not be replaced”. If they seriously believe this to be the case, Resident Advisor have well and truly disappeared up their own arses. Enron thought it was too big to fail – and look what happened.

Next up, the diversity section…

So Resident Advisor have increased their BAME and LGBTQI staff from 6 to 23. They don’t elaborate whether any of them were made redundant by the company earlier in 2020. And earlier in the application, the number of employees Resident Advisor has is blanked out. That means this number has no meaning whatsoever.

Now here’s an excerpt from someone who appears to have read the application and made some notes on it. Earlier on, they revealed the intriguing detail that Resident Advisor would have probably ran out of money by March 2021 had the application been refused. And then they went on to say this…

This seems to be an admission that Resident Advisor could yet be derailed by the repayments of loans taken out to get them through this period. However, no details are given on “how long reductions in salaries are likely to last”.

These aren’t exactly words of praise here. And given a debenture was filed against them by HMRC last November, that’s hardly surprising…