Tag Archives: Beatport

Thinking of using Beatport Link’s streaming service on your next DJ gig, are you? Er, you might have to rethink that plan – and not just because of rubbish wifi at the nightclub…

A while ago now, your favourite blog spoke about Beatport Link. There appears to be money to be made in streaming – certainly not for the artists, but plenty for the labels and plenty for the streaming platforms themselves. Hence why Daniel Ek is worth billions and the average songwriter is broke.

So it’s no mystery why Beatport are getting into the streaming game. Indeed, I strongly suspect a number of other digital dance music stores are looking closely at how they get on. But the question I posed, because I simply couldn’t work it out, was – who is Beatport Link actually aimed at?

Well, a quick look at the terms and conditions of Beatport Link’s service reveals a clue. It turns out it doesn’t cover you for using it in nightclubs – that requires a public performance licence…

This leaves one or two interesting dilemmas. Such as how this policy would be enforced. Let’s say a DJ uses Beatport Link in a nightclub and it turns out this venue has no public performance licence. How would Beatport know the user had used the service improperly?

It also results in a situation where you could use Beatport Link to practice your DJing at home – but later potentially discover you don’t have a copy of a certain track you were hoping to play. Strictly speaking, you can’t actually use Beatport Link to record a set to post on Soundcloud – because they don’t have the licences required for this purpose. Again, how would Beatport stop it?

The simple truth is they can’t – and they probably know it. Either way, I just don’t see this streaming service becoming dance music’s own Spotify…

I suppose all those sinks won’t fix themselves! One year on from his vow to remove his music from the digital stores, exactly how is DJ Sneak getting on with the task?

In the dying days of 2020, DJ Sneak posted a few musings on his social media pages. The pandemic had given him time to think, and he’d decided he would be doing things differently in the future. And one thing he pledged to do was remove his music from the digital stores.

Sneak, possibly having had too many mince pies over the  Christmas break, wanted to pretend it was 1995 again. No pesky internet around then – it was all real DJs playing on vinyl, carrying back-breaking crates of wax around the world. This was a better system, he believes – although possibly not for the backs of those carrying aforementioned crates of wax.

Anyway, I’ve been helping “the original gangster” – as he himself and quite possibly his mother call him – to keep count. Now, this blog makes allowances for the fact master rights may not be owned by DJ Sneak – real name Carlos Sosa – on some records, so I accept it’s going to take a while to acquire control of those back.

On January 19th last year, he had 613 tracks up on Traxsource. Taking all of that down wasn’t going to be an easy undertaking – but the numbers haven’t gone down much. Infact, the lowest they got to was 572 back in May last year. For ease of reference, I’ve prepared this handy, cut out and keep – okay, maybe I wouldn’t go that far – chart which shows the numbers…

Today’s total? At the time of writing this post, 594 records are still on Traxsource. Which increasingly leads me to think that Sneak owns the master recording rights on very few of his own records.

Elsewhere, his total on Beatport is a whopping 791 records. He also has a presence on Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Amazon Music, Deezer and any other number of streaming services. So much for the digital detox, Carlos…

Is it aimed at DJs in clubs or the ones in their kitchens? Beatport recently unveiled a new $9.99 streaming plan – which just leaves me with more questions than answers…

Someone somewhere is benefitting from streaming. But whom? It’s certainly not the artists whose music is on such services. They’re being paid a pittance for the use of their work. And it’s not even really the listeners – who only have access to that music so long as it’s available on their streaming service of choice.

No, streaming ultimately benefits the people behind the streaming companies – yes, I’m looking at you, Daniel Ek, – and the major labels, who make around £1million per hour from it. Now, Beatport has always been a bit more about the money than other dance music stores – not something I mind too much, because they’ve always been more open about it than others.

But even I have to ask questions about why exactly they’re now promoting a Beatport streaming service – and who’s going to benefit from it. A monthly subscription to the platform will cost $9.99 – the reason why that’s always the price is explored here, by the way – and lets you stream as much as you like from their store. Perfect for DJs with super fast internet and a strong wifi connection.

However, how many nightclubs are going to have super fast internet and strong wifi connections? Given that dancefloors are designed with the primary purpose in mind, it doesn’t somehow make sense to install a wifi point in there for the best signal – yet if this kind of streaming is to become normal in the DJ booth, that’s what’ll have to happen in a lot of clubs.

I honestly don’t know who Beatport are aiming this at. Perhaps there are far more bedroom DJs out there than I give credit for, and it might work nicely for some of the younger ones – those who don’t know anything other than streaming.

But for everyone else? I’m yet to be as convinced as Beatport apparently are…

After Traxsource give garage its own category on the site, their rivals at Beatport are keen to remind us they have one too – and are plugging it heavily online…

A few weeks ago, the garage house crew were happy. Traxsource had finally given garage its own category on their site after a campaign which has been on and off for the past three years. And the infighting – for a while rife in the genre – appears to have eased off. Amazing what a bit of scrutiny does…

Anyway, this latest move has not gone unnoticed over at Beatport. I understand that the site has now started an advertising campaign across Facebook and Instagram to promote the fact they have their own garage category as well.

Infact, I’ve actually come across it whilst browsing Facebook. Here’s what readers see…

Garage first appeared as a genre on Beatport all the way back in 2017 – so I’m somewhat surprised they’re not making more of this fact in their adverts. Even more curious is the fact Beatport, which is owned by a big American conglomerate, managed this feat ahead of Traxsource, who frequently claim to have a closer relationship with its customers.

Whatever the truth, one thing is clear – there’s obviously money to be made in garage. Traxsource have decided they want a piece of this pie. And Beatport aren’t going to take it lying down…

Did your takedown requests get lost in the post? DJ Sneak – who promised to take his music off digital stores in January – still has hundreds on Traxsource…

On December 29th last year, DJ Sneak decided to make a few changes to the way he did business. And one of those was to declare his music would be coming down from digital services. This was taken to mean download and streaming sites, although Sneak never elaborated further.

So since January, I’ve been helping DJ Sneak keep to his promise by regularly detailing how many records he still needs to take down on Traxsource. He had 613 tracks up there when this series first started. And it looks like I’m in this commitment to my readers for the long run…

Because at the last update, 596 tracks were on his profile. As of this morning, the number is 599. And the number has never fallen below 572.

Either DJ Sneak never had any intention of following through on his promise, or he’s since discovered he’s signed all kinds of in perpetuity contracts over the years. These are contracts in which the master recordings are signed over from the artist to the label – forever. And if that’s the case, it’s going to cost a lot of money to get them down.

Sneak has been contacted for comment…

EXCLUSIVE: Funny you didn’t mention that bit! T Markakis happily ranted at Glasgow Underground online – but failed to disclose where the samples from “That Jazz Feeling” REALLY came from…

Oh, what a difference a week makes. Last weekend, Greek producer T Markakis ranted online – making allegations that record label Glasgow Underground hadn’t paid him for his most recent release. Label boss Kevin McKay made a statement denying all his allegations.

But in the middle of last week, things went quiet. The steady flow of arguments and counter arguments stopped. For some reason, T Markakis didn’t wish to continue the fight he’d started. Now, Amateur’s House can reveal that there was a little bit more going on – which Markakis curiously didn’t mention in his rant.

T Markakis released two singles through Glasgow Underground during 2020. The first was called “That Jazz Feeling” and the second was “You Got The Love”. The latter of these two was a cover of Candi Staton’s song, first released in 1986. And as I understand it, the original demo contained the Candi Staton acapella – which had to be re-recorded for the track to be released.

But he didn’t tell anyone where the samples from the first record came from. So allow me to help out. The jazz appears to have come from a 1986 release called “Skain’s Domain” by Wynton Marsalis. It starts from around 3 minutes and 53 seconds in. And as for the vocals on “That Jazz Feeling”?

They were lifted directly from “Bring Back That Feeling” by Jason Jinx. The song was originally released on Subliminal back in 2000. Sadly, I will never know if Jinx approved of the song – he died two years ago. But he didn’t mention any of this information to Glasgow Underground at the time of signing it to them.

The result? I’m reliably informed that both of Markakis’s releases are in the process of being removed from the Glasgow Underground archives. The process will take a few days, but should be finished soon. Both productions from Markakis will be removed from both downloads and streaming of any kind.

Being effectively cancelled by one of the biggest labels in house music isn’t going to do your career any good, Tasos…

1+2=0? DJ Sneak’s bizarre new strategy to remove his music from digital stores by adding MORE tracks onto the list

This blog has been doing a public service at the request of its readers over the past few months – although I suspect the protagonist here would prefer I didn’t. I’ve been keeping an eye on DJ Sneak’s vow to remove all his music from the digital stores.

How’s it going? So far, not great. His projected Traxsource Freedom Day – that is, the day his music will all be gone from Traxsource – is currently scheduled just before Christmas… in 2023. Hardly the actions of someone who seems to think he’s leading a musical revolution.

However I get the impression that Sneak’s boycott of the digital stores is either not going to plan, or he just wasn’t serious about it in the first place. Why?

Well, I notice he’s put up two new tracks recently. Here they are. Removing records from digital stores by adding new ones? Yes, this seems like a coherent strategy…

613 reasons why DJ Sneak is missing his target

A few weeks ago, DJ Sneak announced that he was having his music pulled from the digital stores. This was all done in a wave of publicity in the way only Sneak can do.

I notice with great interest that not only is DJ Sneak’s profile still online on Traxsource, but it has 613 different tracks on it. Now, I know that some of those will be compilations, but that still leaves a huge amount of his music available online.

So Mr Sneak, two questions for you:


1. Was all this just a publicity stunt and the truth is you have no intention of removing this music?
2. If your words were genuine, can you give us a progress report detailing how many of your records have been removed from digital sale to date?

I look forward to hearing the answers.